Cummins Powered Dodge Power Wagon

This is the Full Metal Jacket, or FMJ, a 1941 Dodge Power Wagon with a Cummins Turbo Diesel (4BT) under the hood, backed by a TH350 transmission. It was built by Weaver Customs in Utah.

Enjoyed a quick look at this beauty near the end of the 2018 SEMA Show.

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Weaver Customs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Ass Fans AirEye Pedestal Fan

For years I’ve been casually looking for a good fan for my shop. There are many inexpensive ones, from under $100 to a several hundred, but less than a handful that look like they would last long or work well.

At the 2018 SEMA Show I found the Big Ass Fans display near closing time on Thursday. This particular fan, the AirEye Pedestal Fan, is $900 shipped (you assemble), and has a seven year warranty! I was impressed.

This Lexington, Kentucky, company also makes large industrial fans, like the one above in my video, which has a 15 year warranty (if I remember correctly).

Copyright James Langan/RoadTraveler

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Resource:

Big Ass Fans

 

 

 

Diesel Brothers Legion Cooper Tires SEMA Show 2018

At the 2018 SEMA Show, the Diesel Brothers introduced their new Legion tire brand, a collaboration with Cooper Tires.

Copyright James Langan/RoadTraveler All Rights Reserved.

 

Cooper Discoverer S/T MAXX 285/75R16 tread wear

Cooper Tires’ Discoverer S/T MAXX has been my favorite commercial traction/hybrid tread design since its introduction. I have experimented with four sizes on four different truck platforms, and suggested them to many friends and acquaintances. Two of my four-wheel-drives are still running the S/T MAXX, including the built, 2006 V-8 Toyota 4Runner with 4.88:1 gears in this video. 

After a whopping 7,436 miles before the first rotation, mostly road miles, these LT285/75R16 Discoverer S/T MAXX are wearing impressively well and evenly. From their original, generous depth of 18.5/32″, the fronts are down to 16/32″, and the rears 16.5/32″, 2.5 and 2/32″ respectively. That’s an average of 3,300 miles per 1/32″ of tread, and excellent wear from a fairly aggressive, moderate-void tire on a full-time four-wheel-drive car. They were rotated using the rearward cross pattern. 

Copyright James Langan/RoadTraveler

All Rights Reserved.

Source: Cooper Tires